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Revolutionising the Gelatin Market: Innovative applications and growing demand are expected to drive the industry's growth, with an anticipated CAGR of 5.79% by 2023–28. – Actual Market Research
Mar, 31
2023

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Revolutionising the Gelatin Market: Innovative applications and growing demand are expected to drive the industry's growth, with an anticipated CAGR of 5.79% by 2023–28. – Actual Market Research

 

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Gelatin is a protein-rich, flavourless and odourless material generated from collagen, an animal connective tissue structural protein. Due to its gelling, stabilising, emulsifying, and binding qualities, it is widely used in the food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic sectors. Gelatin is created through a hydrolysis process in which collagen is broken down into smaller peptides and amino acids using heat, acid, or enzymes. To suit specific application requirements, the resulting gelatin can be further processed to generate different grades, textures, and functions. Gelatin is found in a wide range of non-food goods, including photographic film, paper currency, and even explosives. Gelatin comes in a variety of grades, ranging from food-grade to pharmaceutical-grade, depending on the level of purity and processing necessary for each use. Gelatin has been used as a treatment for joint pain for ages because it contains chemicals that may assist maintain joint health. Agar-agar and carrageenan, both derived from seaweed, are vegetarian and vegan alternatives to gelatin.

According to the research report, “Global Gelatin Market Research Report, 2028” published by Actual Market Research, the market is anticipated to reach market size of USD 4810.08 Million, increasing from USD 3448.69 Billion in 2022.The market is projected to grow with 5.79 % CAGR for 2023-28. Gelatin has the unique ability to form a gel-like substance when mixed with water. This makes it an essential ingredient in the production of many food products, such as gummy candies, marshmallows, and desserts. Gelatin can help stabilize emulsions, suspensions, and foams in food and cosmetic products. It can prevent separation or settling of the ingredients, resulting in a more uniform and stable product. Gelatin can act as a binding agent in meat products, such as sausages and meatballs, helping to keep the meat mixture together and improve its texture. Gelatin is commonly used as a coating material for pills and capsules in the pharmaceutical industry. It can help protect the contents of the capsule and improve their shelf life. Gelatin can be used to modify the texture of food products, such as improving their chewiness or creaminess. Gelatin is a complete protein, meaning that it contains all essential amino acids required for human nutrition. It can provide a valuable source of protein for people who may not consume enough protein from their diet. Gelatin has been shown to have various health benefits, such as improving joint health, promoting better sleep, and supporting skin health.

Gelatin has a long and interesting history dating back centuries. Its origins can be traced to ancient Egypt and the Middle East, where it was used to make a variety of food and medicinal products. The modern process for producing gelatin was developed in the 1800s by a French chemist named Henri Braconnot. He discovered that boiling animal bones and connective tissue in water produced a substance that would solidify when cooled. This process was further developed by another Frenchman, Denis Papin, in 1682, who first extracted gelatin from bones by boiling them in water. Gelatin's popularity grew rapidly during the 19th century as industrialization led to advancements in food and medicine production. In the early 20th century, the use of gelatin expanded to include photographic film, paper currency, and other non-food products. Today, gelatin is used in many different countries around the world, but it is most commonly associated with Western cuisine. The United States and European countries are the largest producers and consumers of gelatin, with China and Japan also significant producers.

Europe is one of the major regions for gelatin production and consumption, although it is the dominant region. The gelatin market in Europe has experienced steady growth over the years, driven by factors such as increasing demand from the food and pharmaceutical industries, rising health consciousness among consumers, and technological advancements in gelatin manufacturing. The European gelatin market is also characterized by a high degree of competition, with several major players operating in the region. These include companies such as Gelita AG, Rousselot International, and Nitta Gelatin Europe, among others. Many of these companies are investing in research and development to produce new and innovative gelatin products that meet the evolving needs of customers. Germany is one of the largest producers of gelatin in Europe, with several major companies based in the country, including Gelita AG and Rousselot GmbH. France is also a significant producer of gelatin, with companies such as Rousselot International and Geltech SAS based in the country. Spain is home to several gelatin manufacturers, including Viscofan SA and Capsa Food. Italy is a major consumer of gelatin, with companies such as Vebro Polonia and Tetra Pak Italia using gelatin in their products. The UK is also a significant consumer of gelatin, with companies such as Rowett Eatwell Ltd and Caldic UK Ltd using gelatin in their products. Other European countries involved in the production and consumption of gelatin include Belgium, Denmark, Sweden, and the Netherlands, among others. Overall, gelatin is an important ingredient in many industries in Europe, including food, pharmaceuticals, and industrial applications. The region is home to several major players in the gelatin industry, and continues to experience steady growth in demand for gelatin products.

In North America, gelatin has been a staple ingredient in many food and pharmaceutical products for well over a century. Gelatin has been used in North American cuisine for many years, particularly in desserts such as Jell-O, fruit snacks, marshmallows, and gummy candies. In recent years, there has been an increased demand for healthier, plant-based alternatives to gelatin, leading to the development of plant-based gelling agents like agar-agar and carrageenan. Gelatin is widely used as a capsule and tablet coating material in the pharmaceutical industry, as it can protect the active ingredients and help deliver them to the body. In North America, pharmaceutical-grade gelatin is manufactured to meet the specific purity and quality standards required by regulatory agencies such as the FDA. Gelatin has been associated with various health benefits, including improved joint health and skin health. This has led to the development of new products, such as collagen supplements, which are marketed as a source of high-quality collagen derived from animal connective tissues like gelatin. Gelatin has also found applications in non-food industries, such as the production of photographic film and paper currency. In North America, the development of new technologies, such as digital photography and cashless payment systems, has led to a decline in these applications, but gelatin is still used in some niche markets.

Gelatin is a versatile and useful ingredient that is used in a wide range of applications across several industries. Its unique properties as a gelling agent, stabilizer, and thickener make it a valuable ingredient for many products. Gelatin is used in a wide range of sectors, including Meat Processing, Pharma& Healthcare, FMCG, Cosmetics, Photography, and others. Gelatin is commonly used in the food industry as a gelling agent, stabilizer, thickener, and emulsifier. It is used in a variety of food products, including gummy candies, marshmallows, yogurt, and soups. Gelatin is used in the pharmaceutical industry as a coating for capsules and tablets, as well as in the production of vaccines and other medical products. Gelatin is used in cosmetics and personal care products as a thickening agent and to help maintain the texture and consistency of products such as shampoos, conditioners, and lotions. Gelatin is used in the production of photographic film, where it is used as a binder for the light-sensitive silver halide crystals. Gelatin is also used in a variety of industrial applications, such as the production of paper currency, textiles, and adhesives. Gelatin is used in the production of medical products such as wound dressings and bone grafts, and in the development of collagen supplements and other health and wellness products.

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in plant-based alternatives to gelatin, and several manufacturers have launched plant-based gelatin alternatives made from ingredients such as carrageenan, pectin, and agar. These products are being marketed as vegan and vegetarian alternatives to traditional gelatin and are being used in a variety of food, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic products. With the increasing demand for plant-based products, several companies have developed plant-based alternatives to gelatin. These alternatives include ingredients such as carrageenan, pectin, and agar. As consumers become more environmentally conscious, there has been a growing interest in sustainably sourced gelatin. Companies are working on developing new processes for sourcing gelatin from sustainable sources, such as grass-fed cattle and fish by-products.
Gelatin is a food ingredient, and therefore, its use in food products is subject to food regulations in different countries. In the US, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates the use of gelatin in food products, and it is classified as a food additive. In Europe, gelatin is regulated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Gelatin is widely used in the pharmaceutical industry as a coating for capsules and tablets. In the US, the FDA regulates the use of gelatin in pharmaceutical products. In Europe, gelatin is regulated by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). In the US, gelatin is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Gelatin is classified as a food additive and must comply with FDA regulations related to food safety, labeling, and packaging. The FDA also regulates the use of gelatin in pharmaceutical products. In the European Union (EU), gelatin is regulated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA).

Gelatin used in food products must comply with EU regulations related to food safety and labeling, while gelatin used in pharmaceutical products must comply with EMA regulations. In China, gelatin is regulated by the China Food and Drug Administration (CFDA). Gelatin used in food products must comply with CFDA regulations related to food safety and labeling, while gelatin used in pharmaceutical products must comply with CFDA regulations. In Japan, gelatin is regulated by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (MHLW). Gelatin used in food products must comply with MHLW regulations related to food safety and labeling, while gelatin used in pharmaceutical products must comply with MHLW regulations. In India, gelatin is regulated by the Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI). Gelatin used in food products must comply with FSSAI regulations related to food safety and labeling, while gelatin used in pharmaceutical products must comply with regulations set by the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO).

There are several challenges and threats related to the gelatin industry which onclides Gelatin is derived from animal sources such as bovine hides and bones, which are subject to supply chain disruptions due to various factors like disease outbreaks, weather conditions, and trade restrictions. The growing demand for vegan and vegetarian products has led to the development of plant-based alternatives to gelatin, such as agar, carrageenan, and pectin. This could potentially reduce the demand for gelatin in the future. Some consumers may have health concerns related to gelatin consumption, particularly with regards to the use of animal-derived ingredients and potential contamination with pathogens like BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy). The production of gelatin from animal sources has environmental and sustainability implications, particularly with regards to the use of water, land, and energy resources. The industry needs to adopt sustainable sourcing and production practices to address these issues. The gelatin industry is subject to various regulatory requirements related to food safety, quality, and labeling, which can increase costs and complexity for manufacturers. Compliance with these regulations is essential to maintain consumer confidence in the safety and quality of gelatin products.